Crazy Horse and Custer:
The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors


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Crazy Horse and Custer: The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors
by Stephen E. Ambrose

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This is the paperback edition. The  hardback is also available.

Book Description

Synopsis
A dual portrait of the leader of the Oglala Sioux and the general of the U.S. Seventh Cavalry in 1876. The book cites the battle of June 25th and chronicles the sometimes striking similiarities of the lives of both men.

From the Publisher
On the sparkling morning of June 25, 1876, 611 men of the United States 7th Cavalry rode toward the banks of the Little Bighorn in the Montana Territory, where 3,000 Indians stood waiting for battle. The lives of two great warriors would soon be forever linked throughout history: Crazy Horse, leader of the Oglala Sioux, and General George Armstrong Custer. Both were men of aggression and supreme courage. Both became leaders in their societies at very early ages; both were stripped of power, in disgrace, and worked to earn back the respect of their people. And to both of them, the unspoiled grandeur of the Great Plains of North America was an irresistible challenge. Their parallel lives would pave the way, in a manner unknown to either, for an inevitable clash between two nations fighting for possession of the open prairie.

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Editorial Reviews

Native Americans Books

Stephen Ambrose

From Publishers Weekly
Military historian Ambrose examines the connections between the Indian chief and the cavalry officer who fought at Little Bighorn.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Ingram
A dual portrait of the leader of the Oglala Sioux and the general of the U.S. Seventh Cavalry in 1876 cites the battle of June 25 and chronicles the sometimes striking similarities in the lives of both men. Reprint. LJ.

"Movingly told and well written . . . a fine contribution, one that will be read with pleasure and admiration by general reader, student and scholar alike. Ambrose has breathed new life into the familiar facts."--Library Journal

"An epic and accurate retelling of one of our country's most tragic periods."--Baltimore Sun

From the Back Cover
"Movingly told and well written . . . a fine contribution, one that will be read with pleasure and admiration by general reader, student and scholar alike. Ambrose has breathed new life into the familiar facts."--Library Journal

"An epic and accurate retelling of one of our country's most tragic periods."--Baltimore Sun

Author
Stephen E. Ambrose is the author of numerous books, including the New York Times bestseller D-Day and multivolume biographies of Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. He is the founder of the Eisenhower Center and of the National D-Day Museum in New Orleans. He lives in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, and Helena, Montana.

Excerpt - copyrighted material

Chapter One
The Setting and the People: The Great Plains

"As far as the eye could reach the country seemed blackened by innumerable herds [of buffalo]."
Captain Benjamin Bonneville, 1832

"Indians are so excessively indolent and lazy, they would rather starve a week than work a day." James Mackay, 1835

The Great Plains of North America, on a cloudless day, stretch out forever under an infinity of bright blue sky. During the violence of a tornado or a snowstorm, however, the vision is limited to the length of an arm. The Plains can be hot, dusty, brown, flat, and unfit for life; they can be delightfully cool, abundantly watered, a dozen shades of green, marvelously varied in appearance, ranging from near mountains to level valleys, and hospitable to all forms of life.

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